Symposium Agenda and Presentations

Context

The Institute of Fiscal Studies & Democracy (IFSD) global benchmarking exercise provided insights into integrated evidence-based decision support for strategic infrastructure investments.  One key insight is that there is no one best-practice jurisdiction.  In the words of one senior official, “we are all on the same journey”.

The benchmarking exercise did uncover excellent practices and the Infrastructure Symposium brought subject matter experts from New Zealand, Queensland and the United Kingdom along with Canadian infrastructure practitioners to better understand international planning and decision support practices and discuss their applicability in Canada.

Symposium Purpose

To bring together best-practice jurisdictions to share their successes and lessons learned, and discuss the key features of strong infrastructure planning including:

  • Strategic Planning:  identifying what global best practice looks like that delivers integrated evidence-based infrastructure planning (for example, long-term infrastructure plans)
  • Strategic Decision-Making:  identifying how global best practices have integrated evidence-based infrastructure investment decision-making into those plans (for example, prioritizing infrastructure investment with strategic community outcomes)
  • Evidence-Based Enablers:  identifying some of the key tools and processes that deliver strategically-aligned infrastructure investment plans (for example, smart city platforms, big data, analytics and insights).

Monday, September 24, 2018
The Journey To Evidenced-Based Infrastructure Investment Decisions

successes, challenges, and lessons learned from best-practice jurisdictions


8:00-8:30

Registration

8:30-8:40

Opening & Introductory Remarks
Kevin Page, President & CEO of IFSD

8:40-8:50

Keynote Address
Hon. Monte McNaughton, Ontario Minister of Infrastructure

8:50-9:15

Session 1: Setting the Ontario Strategic Planning Context: Creating an Integrated Evidence-Based Infrastructure Planning Approach.

Ontario is making large and sustained investments in infrastructure. An integrated evidence-based strategic planning approach is needed to help guide these investments to maximize the value for money for taxpayers along with the economic, social, environmental and cultural outcomes (benefits) that Ontario seeks. The objectives of this session are twofold. The first is for the MOI to provide insights on the current challenges in creating integrated evidenced-based infrastructure investment decisions. The second is to create the contextual canvas to compare how some of the global best practice jurisdictions are meeting these same challenges.

Chris Giannekos, Associate Deputy Minister, Infrastructure Policy & Planning, Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure (TBD)

9:15-10:45

Session 2: Strategic Planning: How do other jurisdictions develop and implement their Long-term Infrastructure Plans?

Australia, the UK, and New Zealand will or have establishe(d) long-term infrastructure plans and will or have create(d) new governance structures to assist/lead their infrastructure planning. The objectives of this session are to:
1) Explore the similarities and differences between these approaches; and
2) Identify best practices in the development and implementation of infrastructure plans and governance structures.
Speakers: Darren Crombie, Principal, E3 Advisory, Australia, Dr. James Richardson, Chief Economist, National Infrastructure Commission, United Kingdom, Dr. Haydn Read, Head of Infrastructure Programmes, Auckland City Council

Presentations (20 minutes each)
Question and Answer Session (30 minutes)

Dr. Haydn Read presentation, day 1, session 2
Darren Crombie presentation, day 1, session 2
Dr. James Richardson Presentation, day 1, session 2

10:45-11:00

Health/Network Break

11:00-12:30

Session 3: Strategic Decision-Making: How do other jurisdictions make infrastructure investment decisions?

Australia and New Zealand have each established a standardized business case framework and review process to support decision-making. The objective of this session are to:
1) Explore the similarities and differences between these approaches; and
2) Identify best practices in the development and implementation of a business case framework and review process.

Speakers: Darren Crombie, Principal E3 Advisory, Australia, Dr. Haydn Read, Head of Infrastructure Programmes, Auckland City Council

Presentations (20 minutes each)
Question and Answer Session (50 minutes)

Dr. Haydn Read presentation, day 1, session 3
Darren Crombie presentation, day 1, session 3

12:30-13:30

Lunch

13:30-15:00

Session 4: Evidence-Base for Strategic Planning and Decision-Making: How do other jurisdictions collect, analyze, and utilize information to support strategic infrastructure planning and decision-making?

Australia and New Zealand have each enhanced the extent and quality of evidence that is collected, analyzed and utilized for their infrastructure planning (e.g., needs assessment) and decision-making (e.g., prioritization). The objectives of this session are to:
1) Explore the similarities and differences between these approaches; and
2) Identify best practices in the data collection, analysis, and use of evidence for infrastructure planning and decisions.
    a) Current and long-term needs (e.g., demand, service levels, and functionality)
    b) Information on long-term demographic and economic trends
    c) Technological advancements
    d) Social and environmental considerations
    e) Regional/community needs
Speakers: Darren Crombie, Principal, E3 Advisory, Australia, Matthew Vickerstaff, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Infrastrucuture Projects Authority, United Kingdom (invited), Dr. Haydn Read, Head of Infrastructure Programmes, Auckland City Council

Presentations (20 minutes each)
Question and Answer Session (50 minutes)

Dr. Haydn Read presentation, day 1, session 4
Darren Crombie presentation, day 1, session 4

15:00-15:15

Health/ Network Break

15:15-16:30

Session 5: Consolidation Segment

Through panel and audience interaction, there will be a review and discussion of Successes, Challenges, and Lessons Learned discussed during earlier sessions with additional insights provided by private and public panel members, with a goal to identify and isolate key actions and key messages how to implement best practices in Ontario.

Potential Discussion Topics:
• Identifying the broader Canadian/Ontario challenges and a path forward;
• Comparing international versus Ontario context/governance to support best practices;
• Social infrastructure challenges;
• Place-based planning; and
• Impact of technological advancement impact on both the demands on public infrastructure and the government’s ability to manage that demand.

Moderator: Scott Thompson, Deputy Minister, MOI/MTO
Panelists: Kevin Page, President & CEO, IFSD, Peter Harrison, Vice President, Canada, CPCS, Andrew Claerhout, Senior Managing Director, The Boston Consulting Group, formerly Infrastructure & Natural Resources

16:30-16:40

Closing Remarks IFSD (10 mins)
Stephen Lecce, Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Infrastructure

END OF DAY

Tuesday, September 25, 2018
Interactive Sessions on Implementing Best Practices


8:30-8:40

Introductions (IFSD): Kevin Page, President & CEO (10 mins)

8:40-10:10

Session 1: United Kingdom’s National Infrastructure Assessment

Ontario’s Infrastructure for Jobs and Prosperity Act requires that the Province publish a Long-Term Infrastructure Plan (LTIP) every five years. The Act mandates that the LTIP must include a description of the Government’s anticipated infrastructure requirements for at least the ten years following the development of the LTIP as well as the strategy to meet the ten year forward infrastructure requirements. The National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) in the UK has tabled its first National Infrastructure Assessment outlining the UK’s economic infrastructure needs and priorities to 2050. The NIC will detail the process, key elements, challenges and lessons learned in completing the National Infrastructure Assessment. The discussion will then be opened up to workshop participants to discuss the National Infrastructure Assessment and how best to implement a similar Assessment in the Canadian context.

Dr. James Richardson, Chief Economist, National Infrastructure Commission, United Kingdom

Dr. James Richardson presentation, day 2 session 1

10:10-10:25

Health/Network Break (15 mins)

10:25-12:00

Session 2: Maximizing the Value Extracted from the Existing Infrastructure Stock.

The Ontario government campaigned on a commitment to maximize the value for money for Ontarians from public expenditures. The platform included both an emphasis on rebuilding Ontario and extracting efficiencies from public spending and infrastructure has the potential to deliver significant contributions on both fronts. The IFSD benchmarking exercise found that jurisdictions in Australia are an international best practice with respect to extracting the maximum value for money from its infrastructure investments. This workshop will examine the key elements, processes and strategies utilized by governments in Australia to execute this best practice. The discussion will then be open to discuss the key challenges and opportunities facing Canadian practitioners in optimizing the value for money for Canadians from their infrastructure investments.

Darren Crombie, Principal, E3 Advisory, Australia

Darren Crombie presentation, day 2 session 2

12:00-13:00

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Session 3: The data, analytics and insights (evidence) – Canadian/New Zealand contexts

To examine how infrastructure standards and frameworks are used to support investment decisions. Normatively, each infrastructure investment proposal is subject to a suite of analytical interrogations. The results of that analysis provides evidence to support or justify the inclusion (or not) of a project in a capital programme or plan. The more mature jurisdictions are now utilising data standards and frameworks that standardise and harmonise the analytical
environment to interrogate and then prioritise these investments – across sectors. The Approach: Use an interactive workshop to:
1) use a series of already identified infrastructure investment themes that when unpacked give a deeper understanding of how infrastructure is currently managed in Provinces and Municipalities.
2) identify and share the current challenges across the infrastructure sectors in those jurisdictions - in so doing, providing an insight into the ‘current state’ of the challenges to how infrastructure investment decisions are made. 
3) compare these observations to the challenges that are now being met in the more mature jurisdictions, and the evidence of the success in those circumstances.

Dr. Haydn Read, Head of Infrastructure Programmes, Auckland City Council

Dr. Haydn Read presentation, day 2 session 3

14:30-14:45

Health/Network Break

14:45-16:15

Session 4: Digitising Current & Future States to Inform Actual Investment Proposals

To examine how the City of Auckland uses the analytics described in Session 2 to evaluate the performance of infrastructure assets and the infrastructure investment that this attracts. In addition, Dr. Haydn Read will provide a real-time demo of the City of Auckland’s Portal that provides infrastructure stakeholders with a picture of the state of their infrastructure assets as well as future infrastructure needs.
1) the story of the catalyst that created the burning platform, and the response that created the need for integrated ‘nation-building’ practices.
2) demonstrate the interoperability required to build communities.
3) demonstrate the community outcomes that can be given optics with infrastructure investment analytics of the type and nature being conducted in Auckland.
4) An insight into Toronto and the possibilities of the impossible.

Dr. Haydn Read, Head of Infrastructure Programmes, Auckland City Council

Dr. Haydn Read presentation, day 2 session 4

16:15-16:45

Session 5: Next Steps Segment

Moderated by IFSD, the final session of the two-day workshop will be an open discussion that will build off of the consolidation segment of the previous day. With the deeper technical dives looking at future needs, extracting the maximum value out of the current stock and the cutting edge work performed on data standards and analytics we will aim to update the key messages and action items from the previous day’s consolidation segment. In addition,
this session will look to identify if there are any national infrastructure initiatives that could benefit infrastructure planning, execution and synergies across the three orders of government. Examples include a data standards initiative and a standardized approach to identifying future needs to better enable the funding of infrastructure plans rather than infrastructure projects.

Moderator: Kevin Page IFSD
Proposed Panelists: Grant Osborn, ADM, Ministry of Infrastructure, Ontario, Municipal Government tbd, Sean Keenan,
Director General, Policy and Results, Strategic and Horizontal Policy, Director General’s Office Infrastructure Canada

16:45-17:00

Closing Remarks IFSD

END OF DAY